An FAW that’s drilled into its owner’s heart

An FAW that’s drilled into its owner’s heart

The FAW 15.180FL is proving its worth in a water-drilling operation based in Howick, in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands.

Richard Duckworth, owner of Duckworth Drilling, acquired his FAW 15.180FL from his partner who left the business. Most of the company’s customers are farmers and their main demand is for supplementary water-source drilling.

“I had the opportunity to drive long highway routes to distant places in KZN, the Eastern Cape, the Free State and even Mozambique. I also drove on what must surely be some of the worst dirt tracks in far-flung rural areas. From these experiences I can personally attest to the driving attributes of the FAW 15.180FL, as well as to its economy and operating efficiencies,” says Duckworth.

The eight-tonne payload on Duckworth’s flat deck is, according to the owner, an absolute advantage on this rig, which has to carry “a very sizeable drilling machine, a five-tonne air compressor, as well as the borehole casings”.

The vehicle is powered by a six-cylinder Weichai engine that delivers 132 kW with torque of 650 Nm.

“The vehicle has achieved between 18,5 and 19,5 l/100 km during the first few thousand kilometres. Now that she’s settling in nicely, I expect a further drop in fuel usage,” Duckworth says.

“Good driver comfort is also one definite advantage of the FAW 15.180FL,” he adds. A well-sprung air-suspended seat, adjustable steering column, effective air-conditioning system and standard ABS with automatic slack-adjusting brakes are all standard.

“What is especially important is the aftersales support I enjoy from the FAW regional team in KwaZulu-Natal, with its excellent standard of service and parts supply. I also appreciate the company’s willingness to understand the demands of a relatively small business such as mine where downtime is not only critical, but can be harmful to my ability to keep my customers happy,” Duckworth concludes.

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